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Missouri Agriculture 

CL Statiitkat Snapaftot 




A summary of the state's agricultural statistics, 
including the Missouri Department of Agriculture's 

annual report 
2003 



The horse photo, located in the upper left corner of the 

collage on the cover, was taken by Julie Ray of Image 

Design Photos in Columbia, Missouri. 

The horse is King Wimpy's Flash, 

an American Paint Horse. 




Diversified is a word com- 
monly used to describe ag- 
riculture in Missouri as the 
collage (left) highlights. 
Pictured clockwise from 
left: An American Paint 
Horse, a combine harvest- 
ing wheat, Blumenhof Win- 
ery in Dutzow, a fisherman 
at Windrush Farms, beef 
cattle, round hay bales, and 
a peach orchard. 



"In Missouri, we have a highly diversified agricultural economy. 
Our producers range from large-scale international seed and poultry 
processing companies to small horticultural operations serving local 
farmers ' markets. While each operation is unique to itself all are 
interrelated. " 

Gov. Bob Holden 

World Agriculture Forum 

May 20, 2003 



"We will continue to look for ways to partner with the private sector, 
university systems and the federal government on programs to 
promote agriculture, foster rural economic development and build 
the state s life sciences industry. The road ahead is bright, and I'm 
happy to be able to play a part in the future of Missouri agriculture. " 

Peter Hofherr 

Director of the Missouri Department of Agriculture 

July 8, 2003 



Table of Contents 

Missouri Department of Agriculture 3 

Office of the Director 4 

Missouri State Milk Board 5 

Missouri Agricultural Statistics Service 5 

Agriculture Business Development 6 

AgriMissouri Program 6 

Agriculture Innovation Center 7 

International Marketing Program 7 

Grape and Wine Program 7 

Missouri Agricultural & Small Business Development 

Authority 8 

Agriculture Development Fund 8 

Animal Health 9 

Animal Care Facilities Act Program 9 

Disease Control and Eradication 10 

Livestock Assurance, Food Safety and Foreign Animal 
Disease Surveillance 10 

Grain Inspection and Warehousing 11 

Grain Inspection Services 11 

Grain Regulatory Services 12 

Market Information and Outreach 13 

Market News 13 

Outreach Program 14 

Sustainable Agriculture Demostration Award Program .... 15 

Plant Industries 16 

Bureau of Feed and Seed 16 

Bureau of Pesticide Control 17 

Bureau of Plant Pest Control 17 

Bureau of Integrated Pest Management 18 

Boll Weevil Eradication Program 18 

Organic Certification Program 19 

Forest Resources Program 19 

Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Inspection Program 19 

Missouri State Fair 20 

Weights and Measures 21 

Device and Commodity Inspection Program 21 

Petroleum/Propane/ Anhydrous Ammonia 22 

Metrology Lab/Moisture Meter Program 22 

Department's Budget Summary 23 




Director 

Peter Hofherr 

573-751-3359 

Deputy Director 

Dave Dillon 

573-522-1133 



Department Phone 
Number: 

573-751-4211 



Address: 

P.O. Box 630 

Jefferson City, MO 
65102 



Website: 

www.mda.mo.gov 



E-mail: 

aginfo@mail.mda.state.mo.us 



Midtawd ^Department of 

Agriculture 

The Missouri Department of Agriculture has 
represented the diverse interests of the state's 
vast agricultural industry since the mid- 
1 800s. The department has the dual respon- 
sibility of protecting the state's producers, 
processors, distributors and consumers of 
food, fuel and fiber, while marketing Mis- 
souri products at home and abroad. Depart- 
ment programs focus on: 

Agriculture education 

Agriculture statistics 

Animals and animal products 

Business development 

Consumer protection 

Environmental issues 

Financial assistance 

Fuel quality 

Inspections, licenses and permits 

Marketing and promotion 

Missouri State Fair 

Pest management 

Plants, grain, feed and seed 

Small farm assistance 





Director 

Peter Hofherr 

573-751-3359 

Deputy Director 

Dave Dillon 

573-522-1133 



Office of the Director 
Programs: 

Budget 

Fiscal 

Grants Management 

Human Resources 

Information Technology 

Policy and Planning 

Public Affairs 



Web site: 

www.mda.mo.gov 



E-mail: 

aginfo@mail.mda.state.mo.us 



Offkeoftfie 

Director 



Appointed by the governor and confirmed 
by the Senate, the director of agriculture: 

• oversees the department's budget 
and operations; 

• determines department policy; 

• represents the administration on 
agriculture matters; 

• enforces state agricultural statutes; 

• monitors the success of the 
department's regulatory and pro- 
motional programs; and 

• serves as a liaison to the governor, 
the state legislature, numerous 
agricultural and environmental 
organizations and the public. 




Peter Hofherr (left), director of the Missouri Department of Agri- 
culture, visits with the youth that showed Grand Champion ani- 
mals at the 2003 Missouri State Fair in Sedalia, Missouri. 



Office of the Director 



Missouri State Milk Board 

The director is a standing 
member of several boards 
and commissions, includ- 
ing the State Milk Board. 
The 12-member board ad- 
ministers the state's 
Grade A and manufactur- 
ing grade milk sanitation 
programs. The programs 
enforce sanitation and 
quality standards for 
manufactured dairy products and 
provide market testing of all milk at the first point of sale, 
licenses: 

milk procurers, 

manufacturing plants, 

field superintendents, 

testers, 

graders, 

samplers, 

bulk milk truck operators, and 

market testing laboratories. 




Missouri ranks 21st in milk production. 



The board 



Missouri Agricultural Statistics Service 

t ,ii j| ^l The director's office also supports the operations 
^^^ of the Missouri Agricultural Statistics Service 
I _^m (MASS), a federal-state cooperative agency. 
MASS compiles and disseminates information 
about the state's agricultural industry, including 
county agricultural profiles and crop, weather and livestock reports. 
The service also issues Missouri Farm Facts, the annual summary of 
the state's crop and livestock production, and conducts Missouri's 
portion of the national Census of Agriculture every five years. 





Division Director 

Deanne Hackman 

573-522-3454 



Ag Business 

Development 

Programs: 

AgriMissouri 

Agriculture Innovation 
Center 

International Marketing 

Grape and Wine 

Missouri Ag and Small 

Business Development 

Authority 

Agriculture Development 
Fund 



E-mail: 

agrimo@mail.mda.state.mo.us 

aginnovationcenter@ 
mail. mda. state. mo.us 



SHuiaion of, 

Ag Business 
Development 



The Agriculture Business Development Di- 
vision helps create opportunities for 
Missouri's farmers and agribusinesses by 
providing assistance in the following areas: 

• capitalization 

• business planning 

• marketing 

• industry development 

• product and brand development 

• organizational structures 

• legal issues 

AgriMissouri Program 

AgriMissouri is 
a branded pro- 
gram designed 
to increase the 
demand for ag- 
ricultural prod- 
ucts raised and 
processed in 
Missouri. The 
program, estab- 
lished in 1985, 
represents more than 550 farmers, compa- 
nies and farmers' markets statewide and 
plays a key role in increasing consumer rec- 
ognition of Missouri agricultural products 
through retail, restaurant and foodservice 
channels. 





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The A 
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Confi 


griMissouri Program u 
w logo at the 2002 Gov 
rence on Agriculture. 


nveiled 
ernor s 



tbUmum of, Ag Business Development 

Agriculture Innovation Center 

The Agriculture Innovation Center's primary objective is to enhance 
farm profitability through innovations in technology, marketing and 
economic organization. In addition to providing one-on-one assis- 
tance to producers interested in producing, marketing or processing 
their commodities in new ways, the center works with a wide variety 
of professionals involved in value-added agriculture. 



International Marketing Program 



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Missouri Food and Fiber, Jefferson City, was 
one of 1 5 Missouri companies exhibiting at the 
2003 U.S. Food Export Showcase, held May 
4-6 in Chicago. The show draws more than 
28,000 domestic and international buyers. 



The International Marketing Pro- 
gram helps Missouri's farmers, 
agribusinesses, food processors and 
forest product companies develop 
and expand international marketing 
opportunities for their products. 
The program provides export coun- 
seling, market research, trade leads 
and opportunities to meet interna- 
tional buyers. The International 
Marketing Program also operates 
trade offices in Taiwan and Mexico. 



Grape and Wine Program 

Every year, nearly 1.5 million people visit 
Missouri's wineries to taste an array of 
award- winning wines. The Grape and 
Wine Program supports the grape and 
wine industry by promoting grape prod- 
ucts, providing advisory services and con- 
ducting research. The program is funded 
by a tax on all wine sold in Missouri. A 
Wine and Grape Advisory Board provides 
recommendations on strategic issues and 
program operations. 




The Missouri legislature declared the 
Norton grape the state s official grape 
in 2003. 



Skobton of Ag Business Development 



Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority 

The Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Author- 
ity provides financial assistance to new and expanding producers 
hrough: 

tax credit programs that stimulate investment in new gen- 
eration cooperatives and other rural enterprises that add value 
to agricultural goods; 

grants to finance projects that add value to agricultural 
goods; 

loan guarantees that provide financial back-up to institu- 
tions that finance livestock facilities and value-added 
projects; 

tax-free bonds issued to lenders making low-interest loans 
to beginning farmers; and 

direct loans for animal waste treatment systems and alterna- 
tive agriculture enterprises. 



Agriculture Development Fund 

The Agriculture Development Fund 
supports a variety of financial as- 
sistance programs designed to aid 
rural Missouri residents and their 
communities. The fund provides 
for programs that help young 
people undertake crop and livestock 
projects and ventures that enhance 
Missouri's rural communities. The 
fund also finances college scholar- 
ships, loans for alternative farming 
enterprises, and the Missouri 
Agribusiness Academy, which ac- 
quaints high school students with 
the variety of careers available in 
agriculture. 




The department 's financial assistance programs 
benefit Missouri s rural communities, such as 
the one pictured here. 




State Veterinarian 

Dr. Taylor Woods 

573-751-3377 



Animal Health 
Programs: 

Animal Care Facilities 
Act Program 

Disease Control and 
Eradication 

Food Safety 

Foreign Animal Disease 
Surveillance 

Livestock Quality 
Assurance 

Meat Inspection 

Poultry Health 



E-mail: 

Animal_Health@mail.mda. state. mo. us 



tDuuaionaf, 

Animal Health 



The Animal Health Division, under the di- 
rection of the state veterinarian, protects and 
promotes Missouri's livestock industry. The 
division administers both mandatory and 
voluntary regulatory programs for beef and 
dairy cattle, horses, swine, poultry, sheep, 
goats, elk, and companion animals. 

Animal Care Facilities Act Program 

The Animal Care Facilities Act Program 
(ACFA) ensures dogs and cats, specifically 
those under the care of breeders, pet sitters, 
intermediate handlers, dealers, exhibitors, 
hobbyists, boarders, retail pet stores, animal 
shelters, rescue operations and municipal 
pounds, receive adequate care, shelter, health 
care and socialization. 





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The ACFA program s eight animal health officers rescued more 
than 100 abused and neglected dogs in 2002. 



iDwitienaf Animal Health 




Disease Control and Eradication 

The state's progress in national dis- 
ease control and eradication pro- 
grams is due to the cooperative ef- 
forts of livestock producers, mar- 
kets, practicing veterinarians, other 
agencies and animal health staff, 
including those in the department's 

Beth Melton tests for animal health diseases at tffQ diagnostic labg m J e fferSOn City 

the Springfield Animal Health Laboratory. a J 

and Springfield. Through these co- 
operative efforts, Missouri has achieved bovine Tuberculosis Free 
status, swine Pseudorabies Stage V status, Pullorum-typhoid Clean 
status in poultry and is working toward Brucellosis-free status in 
cattle. 

Livestock Quality Assurance, Food Safety and Foreign 
Animal Disease Surveillance 

The division offers informa- 
tive programs and publica- 
tions on disease control, live- 
stock quality assurance, food 
safety and foreign animal dis- 
ease surveillance. The state's 
Meat and Poultry Inspection 
Program provides inspection 
services for processing plants 
and sanitary inspections of 
custom exempt processing 
plants. 




The Animal Health Division 's mobile response unit was 
developed to assist in the event of an animal disease 
emergency or bioterrorist attack. 



The Division of Animal Health is also working to: 

• establish a rapid response team for agriterrorism threats and for- 
eign animal disease; 

• expand the Chronic Wasting Disease surveillance program; and 

• implement health passports to expedite interstate movement of 
equine. 




Division Director 

Rich Kaiser 
573-751-5515 



Grain Inspection and 

Warehousing 

Programs: 

Grain Inspection 

Services 

Grain Regulatory 
Services 



E-mail: 

Joyce_Lewis@mail.mda. state. mo. us 



tDuuaionaf, 

Grain Inspection 
and Warehousing 



The Grain Inspection and Warehousing Di- 
vision works to protect the interests of grain 
producers, merchandisers, warehousemen, 
processors and consumers through two pro- 
grams: Grain Inspection Services and 
Grain Regulatory Services. 

Grain Inspection Services 

Employees of the Grain Inspection Services 
program inspect, grade and weigh grain 
stored in or moved through terminals in Mis- 
souri. The program provides official inspec- 
tion and weighing services to ensure that 
grain and rice are marketed at a fair value. 
Services are provided at inspection offices 
in Kansas City, Laddonia, Marshall, New 
Madrid and St. Joseph. The inspection of- 
fices provide standard quality determina- 
tions of test weight, moisture, foreign mate- 
rial and damage. 
Chemical analysis 
tests are also pro- 
vided to deter- 
mine the protein 
and oil content of 
grain and to detect 
the presence of 
mycotoxins. 






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A department inspector 
pulls grain from a bin for 
testing. 



tDiwaianef. Grain Inspection & Warehousing 

Grain Regulatory Services 

Employees of the Grain Regulatory Services program protect the 
public interest by auditing grain warehouses and grain dealers to 
determine grain obligations and financial solvency. 

The program enforces Missouri's Grain Warehouse and Grain Dealer 
Laws so producers are assured they are storing or merchandising 
their grain with licensed, bonded, reputable and financially stable 
grain businesses. 




Show-Me State pro- 
ducers annually har- 
vest up to 650 million 
bushels of grain val- 
ued at more than $2 
billion, making grain 
production one of the 
state 's top industries. 



The Grain Regulatory Services Program: 

• licenses approximately 450 grain dealers and 200 

warehouses with a capacity of more than 100 
million bushels, 

annually conducts more than 800 audits and 
investigations, and 

administers the Missouri Agricultural Mediation 
Program, which provides mediation services to U.S. 
Department of Agriculture customers working to 
resolve disputes with USD A agencies. 




Acting 
Division Director 

Loyd Wilson 
573-751-2613 



Market Information 

and Outreach 

Programs: 

Market News 

Outreach Program 

Sustainable Agriculture 

Demonstration Award 

Program 



E-mail: 

MIO@mail.mda.state.mo.us 



tDutiaionaf, 

Market Information 
and Outreach 



The Division of Market Information and 
Outreach provides educational resources and 
market information. The division's goal is 
to improve the economic environment for 
Missouri producers and increase public 
knowledge and appreciation of Missouri 
agriculture. 

Market News 

Working closely with the U.S. Department 
of Agriculture, the division's market news 
staff reports prices from 20 livestock 
auctions and 15 grain markets in Missouri. 
Reports are also generated from direct sales 
and voluntary producer participation. The 
division also coordinates a timber price 
reporting pilot project based on voluntary 
producer participation. 




Each year, the division hosts the Livestock Grading and Judging 
Contest and Workshop, which gives Missouri youth an opportu- 
nity to learn more about marketing live animals. 



iDwitietief Market Information & Outreach 



Outreach Program 

The Outreach Program pro- 
vides information about 
Missouri agriculture and 
department services to ur- 
ban, rural, farm and non- 
farm audiences as a means 
of educating, informing, 
and engaging the public. 
The program's goal is to 
increase all Missourians' 
knowledge of the eco- 
nomic, historical, and so- 
cial value of agriculture 

through educational materials and participation in special events 
throughout the year. Such events include the Missouri State Fair, 
Earth Day at the Capitol and National Agriculture Week. 




■Hfei ■ 



Visitors to AgCitement at the Missouri State Fair learn about 
Missouri agriculture while playing with corn and soybeans. 



Outreach staff also work with rural Missouri youth to inform them 
about agriculture -related college degrees and careers. Outreach pro- 
grams include: 

• the Missouri Agribusiness 
Academy 

• the Missouri Youth Live- 
stock Grading and Judging 
Contest and Workshop 

• Building Our American 
Communities grants 

• college scholarships 

• the FFA Marketing 

AsriMlSSOUri Products ^ e 2003 Missouri Agribusiness Academy takes a break 

during a trip to St. Louis. The academy acquaints high 
l^OnieSl school students with careers in agriculture. 




iDwitietief Market Information & Outreach 



The Market Information and Outreach Division serves as a liaison 
between the department and Missouri agricultural commodity 
associations. Division staff publish and distribute current information 
on the state's agriculture commodity groups, coordinate commodity 
merchandising council elections, and prepare proclamations. 



Market Information and 
Outreach staff also educate 
producers about improving 
overall quality and market value 
of livestock in Missouri. 
Producers have the opportunity 
to participate in programs such 
as the Show-Me Select Heifer 
program and value-added calf 
programs. 




Market Information and Outreach staff help pro- 
ducers get the most value out of their livestock 
through several educational and marketing oppor- 
tunities. 




The Sustainable Agriculture Demon- 
stration Award Program provides grants 
to Missouri farmers to help them test, 
evaluate and adopt innovative, sustainable 
agriculture practices on their farms. 
Projects must reduce dependency on non- 
renewable resources, while protecting and 
conserving natural resources. 



Michael Lane, Hartville, received a Sustainable Agriculture 
Demonstration Award grant to build a passive underground 
freezer to store apples on his farm. 




Acting 
Division Director 

Jim Lea 

573-751-2462 



Plant Industries 
Programs: 

Bureau of Feed and 
Seed 

Bureau of Pesticide 
Control 

Bureau of Plant Pest 
Control 

Bureau of Integrated 
Pest Management 

Forest Resources 
Program 

Fresh Fruit and 

Vegetable Inspection 

Program 



E-mail: 

Lisa_Wilde@mail.mda. state. mo. us 



tDutiaionaf, 

Plant Industries 



The Plant Industries Division: 

• works to prevent the spread of harm- 
ful insects and plant diseases; 

• certifies and licenses commercial 
and private pesticide applicators and 
dealers; 

• assures label accuracy and quality of 
commercial feeds and seeds; 

• inspects and certifies agricultural 
commodities for exporting; and 

• inspects fresh fruits and vegetables 
to assure quality and grade. 

The Bureau of Feed and Seed administers 
the Missouri Commercial Feed Law, which 
regulates the manufacture, distribution, and 
labeling of commercial feed products in the 
state. Random inspections, sampling, analy- 
sis, and label review of feed products and 
ingredients ensure that livestock producers 
and pet 
owners 
receive 
the feed 
product 
guaran- 
teed on 
the la- 
bel. 

Dennis Noring conducts a test on a feed sa 
at the Jefferson City feed and seed laboratory. 




gfofafeftg^Plant Industries 



Under the Missouri Seed Law, the bureau regulates seed products 
offered for sale in the state. Analysts inspect, sample, and test seed 
and review labels to ensure the product meets the guarantees as to 
test date, origin, purity, and germination. The bureau also regulates 
interstate movement of seed with cooperation from the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture's Seed Regulatory and Testing Branch. 

The Bureau of Pesticide Control monitors the sale and use of pes- 
ticides and promotes best management practices for using pesticides. 
The bureau inspects: 

• applicator use records, 

• dealer sales records, 

• certification credentials, 

• applicator training records and 

• pesticide sales at the retail, 
wholesale and producer levels. 

In the past year, the bureau: 

• administered 3,039 certification 
examinations, 

• conducted more than 11,809 pes- 
ticide use investigations, 

• licensed more than 34,334 appli- 
cators and dealers, and 

• registered 11,525 pesticide prod- 
ucts. 




The department's Bureau of Pesticide Con- 
trol inspects the use of pesticides by applica- 
tors such as the one pictured here. 




An inspector examines the leaves of a plant 
infested with rosevirus. 



The Bureau of Plant Pest Con- 
trol works to prevent the intro- 
duction and spread of harmful 
insects and plant diseases 
through surveys and quarantines 
and annually inspecting and cer- 
tifying nurseries and green- 
houses. Agricultural exports are 
also inspected to ensure they 
meet the requirements of their 
destination country. 



2>wi6Uui<4 Plant Industries 



In the past year, the bureau: 

• inspected and certified approximately 7,000 acres of nurs- 
ery stock, 

• issued more than 1,300 nursery dealer certificates, and 

• granted more than 1 ,700 export certificates for more than 
$200 million worth of goods. 



The bureau's regulatory and edu- 
cational efforts also work to keep 
Missouri free of the gypsy moth, a 
tree-eating pest that has the poten- 
tial to strip entire forests. Each 
year more than 11,000 traps are 
placed throughout the state to pre- 
vent the gypsy moth from becom- 
ing established in Missouri. 




Gypsy moth traps, such as the one pictured above, 
dot the landscape of the state's wooded areas 
during the summer months. 



The Bureau of Integrated Pest Management administers the: 

• Boll Weevil Eradication Program 

• Organic Certification Program 




The Boll Weevil Eradication Pro- 
gram works to prevent the pest 
from feasting on Missouri cotton. 



The Boll Weevil Eradication Program co- 
ordinates the grower-funded effort to elimi- 
nate boll weevil populations from Missouri 
cotton fields. The program, directed by the 
Missouri Cotton Growers Organization and 
a nine-member board, is implemented 
through the efforts of the Southeastern Boll 
Weevil Eradication Foundation, Inc. The 
bureau acts as a liaison between the groups 
involved with the program, provides regu- 
latory oversight and collects cotton grower 
assessments. 



tDwuionof, Plant Industries 




The Organic Certification Program, a new ini- 
tiative accredited by the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture's National Organic Program, certi- 
fies organic producers and processors. This pro- 
gram also provides resources and contact infor- 
mation to producers interested in organics. 



The Forest Resources Program ad- 
ministers the Treated Timber Law, 
which regulates the wood treating in- 
dustry. Inspections are conducted 
throughout the state, and a variety of 
treated wood products are sampled to 
ensure Missouri consumers are pur- 
chasing quality products. The program 
also works with the annual gypsy moth 
survey and administers Missouri weed 
regulations. 



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An inspector takes a sample of treated 
fence posts. 



The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Inspection Program: 

• assures handlers of fruits and 



vegetables that their products 
meet USDA quality grades, 

• administers terminal market 
inspections to help wholesalers 
gain restitution for products that 
fail to meet standards agreed to 
when purchased, and 

• provides USDA grades for 

Mark Troup, coordinator of the Fresh Fruit and MlSS0Uri-2r0Wn DroduCe 
Vegetable Program, inspects a box of fruit. 





State Fair 
Director 

Mel Willard 
660-530-5600 



State Fair 
Programs: 

Fiscal Office 

Business Office 

Entry Office 

Marketing 

Off-Season Events/ 
Concessions 



E-mail: 

missouristatefair2@hotmai!.com 




State Fair 



The Missouri State Fair is the premier show- 
case of Missouri agriculture, as well as the 
state's industrial, mineral and cultural re- 
sources. Established in 1899, it is one of 
the oldest fairs in the country. The state fair- 
grounds occupy 396 acres in southwestern 
Sedalia, and many of the buildings are listed 
on the National Register of Historic Places. 




A young visitor to the Missouri State Fair s AgCitement Center 
learns about agriculture by playing "Farmer for a Day. " 

Each year, hundreds of thousands of people 
take part in the fair's educational, competi- 
tive and recreational opportunities, while ex- 
hibiting all aspects of Missouri agriculture: 
livestock, row crops, farm equipment, fruits 
and vegetables, and arts and crafts. 

Entertainment is also central to the fair. 
Many of the nation's top performers have 
played at the fair, which features a grand- 
stand facility, exhibition center and a half- 
mile dirt racetrack. 

The Missouri State Fair Commission, ap- 
pointed by the governor, oversees year- 
round operations. 




Division Director 

Ron Hooker 

573-751-4316 



Weights and Measures 
Programs: 

Device and Commodity 
Inspection Program 

Metrology Laboratory/ 
Moisture Meter Program 

Petroleum/Propane/ 
Anhydrous Ammonia 

Fuel Quality Program 



E-mail: 

Janet_Carel@mail.mda. state. mo.us 



Weights and Measures 

Known as the consumer protection arm of 
the department, the Weights and Measures 
Division protects buyers and sellers when- 
ever goods and services are exchanged. The 
division: 

• inspects commercial weighing and 
measuring devices; 

• prevents unfair or deceptive weigh- 
ing and measuring practices; 

• provides precise calibration and me- 
trology services; 

• ensures fuel quality; 

• inspects eggs for grade, size, origin 
and packaging; and 

• ensures milk is not sold under cost. 

The Device and Commodity Inspection 
Program ensures shoppers get what they 
pay for. Last year, program employees con- 
ducted: 

• 3,798 egg inspections, 

• 4,352 milk inspections, and 

• 19,773 price verification inspections. 



A Weights and 
Measures in- 
spector tests 
the accuracy of 
a livestock 
market scale. 




tDiuiiianef. Weights and Measures 

Fairness and safety are the goals of the division's Petroleum/Pro- 
pane/Anhydrous Ammonia and Fuel Quality Programs. Last year, 
field staff inspected more than 125,000 gasoline pumps for accuracy 
and 8,100 service stations and bulk plants for safety. The program 
cited more than 16,298 safety violations at service stations. Inspec- 
tors conducted more than 3,851 LP gas safety inspections at bulk 
plants, schools, nursing homes and other public, industrial and com- 
mercial facilities using and storing LP gas. The Fuel Quality Pro- 
gram maintained its record of keeping octane mislabeling low due to 
an aggressive inspection and testing program that performed more 
than 55,533 tests on more than 8,485 fuel samples. 




State fuel inspectors Tim Mustek (left) and 
Curtis Wall test a gasoline pump at one of 
the Lake of the Ozarks' 131 marinas. The 
two inspect all marinas throughout Missouri 
—from the upper Mississippi River down to 
Bull Shoals Lake — once a year. When 
they 're not inspecting marinas, Musick and 
Wall join 18 other state fuel inspectors in 
inspecting Missouri's 125,000 gasoline 
pumps twice a year and collecting fuel 
samples to test for contaminants. 



The Metrology Laboratory/Moisture Meter Program checks mass 

calibration accuracy. Last year, the program: 

certified more than 6,5 10 test weights and 157 vol- 
ume measures, 

issued 471 metrology certificates and 
inspected 760 moisture meters. 



Missouri Department of Agriculture: Financial Summary 





FY 2002 


FY 2003 


FY 2004 




Appropriation 


Appropriation 


Appropriation 


Office of the Director 


$7,531,269 


$8,541,565 


$7,126,046 


Division of Ag Business Development 








3,663,832 


Division of Market Info and Outreach 








876,966 


Division of Market Development 


4,065,109 


3,681,004 





Division of Animal Health 


4,138,618 


4,179,343 


4,701,512 


Division of Grain Inspection and 








Warehousing 


3,328,526 


3,307,315 


3,335,618 


Division of Plant Industries 


3,812,614 


3,208,321 


2,866,009 


Division of Weights and Measures 


3,041,616 


3,472,297 


5,721,928 


Missouri State Fair 


5,105,616 


4,900,450 


4,875,262 


State Milk Board 


2,031,815 


2,081,318 


1,911,926 


DEPARTMENT TOTAL 


$33,055,183 


$33,371,613 


$35,079,129 


General Revenue 


15,333,314 


15,848,145 


13,320,811 


Federal Funds 


1,656,235 


3,263,590 


5,875,382 


Animal Health Laboratory Fee Fund 


451,844 


451,844 


595,878 


Animal Care Reserve Fund 


417,983 


322,235 


606,369 


Livestock Brands Fund 


59,125 


42,225 


42,227 


Commodity Council Merchandising 








Fund 


176,212 


176,212 


176,975 


Single-Purpose Animal Facilities 








Loan Program Fund 


81,086 


81,086 


116,748 


State Fair Fees Fund 


4,196,817 


4,201,817 


4,285,644 


Aquaculture Marketing Development 








Fund 


32,692 


32,692 


32,795 


Livestock Sales and Markets Fees Fund 


32,784 


32,784 


32,788 


Apple Merchandising Fund 


12,000 


12,000 


12,000 


Livestock Dealer Law Enforcement 








and Administration Fund 


12,389 


12,389 


12,390 


Milk Inspection Fee Fund 


1,661,041 


1,762,343 


1,7,66,240 


Grain Inspection Fee Fund 


2,403,984 


2,251,940 


2,608,787 


State Contracted Manufacturing 








Dairy Plant Inspection and 








Grading Fee Fund 


8,000 


8,000 


8,000 


Petroleum Inspection Fund 


1,715,624 


2,110,536 


2,509,616 


Petroleum Violation Escrow Fund 


2,450,000 


1,000,000 


500,000 


Marketing Development Fund 


743,593 


788,237 


1,540,228 


Agriculture Bond Trustee Fund 


135,000 


135,000 


135,000 


Boll Weevil Suppression and 








Eradication Fund 


683,304 


60,456 


106,226 


Missouri Wine Marketing Fund 


15,000 


15,000 


15,000 


Agriculture Development Fund 


737,156 


723,082 


740,025 


State Institutions Gift Trust Fund 


30,000 


30,000 


30,000 


State Fair Trust Fund 


10,000 


10,000 


10,000 


Full-time equivalent employees 


460.47 


468.34 


457.75 



2003 

Missouri 

Agricultural Summary 



Issued Cooperatively by 





MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

Peter Hofherr, Director 

P.O. Box 630 

Jefferson City, Missouri 65 1 02 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

National Agricultural Statistics Service 

Ron Bosecker, Administrator 

Washington, DC 20250 



Compiled by 

Missouri Agricultural Statistics Service 

Gene Danekas, State Statistician 

Marlowe Schlegel, Deputy State Statistician 

P.O. Box L 

Columbia, Missouri 65205 

(573) 876-0950 

FAX (573) 876-0973 

nass-mo@nass .usda. gov 

agebb.missouri.edu/mass 



Editors 

Becky Gorman, MASS 
Sally Oxenhandler, MDA 



Statisticians 

David Emslie 
Clarence Mends 

Rodger Ott 

Tommy Sallee 

Carl Scott 

Carla Whitt 



Office Staff 

Data Processing 

Jim Else 
Bobby Mitchem 



August 2003 



Support Staff 

Cynthia Daffron 

Joyce Holley 

Audrey Leaton 

Denise Morris 

Reba Newman 

Vicki Pauley 

Bonnie Winberg 



Missouri Agricultural Facts 

Agriculture continues as a solid base for the economy of Missouri. The State=s 1 07,000 farms 
produced and sold about $4.40 billion worth of crops, livestock, poultry and aquaculture in 
2002, down 7 percent from 2001 . Livestock and poultry accounted for about 52 percent of the 
agricultural output, down 5 points from 57 percent in 2001 while crops made up the other 48 
percent of the total. 

The wide range of climate, topography and availability of irrigation water in the State results in 
considerable variability in crops produced. Soybeans and corn are by far the dominant crops in 
Missouri, being particularly important in the northern half of the State and in the 
southeast(Bootheel). The Bootheel is the most intensively cropped area with its high 
percentage of tillable, level land, long growing season and plentiful irrigation water. Cotton and 
rice are predominant crops in some southeastern counties. Hay is the most widely produced 
crop, ranking third in total value in the State, although normally only about 1 percent of the 
hay is sold. Hay is easily the major crop in the southwest and south-central districts where 
tillable land is limited, while a major proportion of farms in the rest of the State also raise hay. 

Missouri is one of the leading livestock states in the nation. Cow-calf production fits in with crop 
production on many farms across the State, but beef operations are of major importance in the 
central, southwest, and south-central districts. Hog production is also widespread, but 
especially concentrated in the north-central and west-central districts. Broilers and turkeys are 
dominant in the southwestern counties. 

Note the importance of Missouri to the nation=s agriculture as shown by the following: 

* NINE percent of the U.S. TURKEYS are raised in Missouri. 

* SEVEN percent of the U.S. CATTLE OPERATIONS are in Missouri. 

* SIX percent of the U.S. SOYBEANS are grown in Missouri. 

* FIVE percent of the U.S. FARMS are in Missouri. 

* FOUR percent of the U.S. GRAIN SORGHUM is grown in Missouri. 

* FOUR percent of the U.S. HOG OPERATIONS are in Missouri. 

* Missouri is the SECOND leading state in BEEF COWS. 

* Missouri is the SECOND leading state in NUMBER OF FARMS. 

* Missouri is the SECOND leading state in HAY PRODUCTION (excluding alfalfa). 

* Missouri ranks SIXTH in RICE PRODUCTION. 

* Missouri ranks SIXTH in SOYBEAN PRODUCTION. 

* Missouri ranks EIGHTH in WATERMELON PRODUCTION. 

* Missouri ranks NINTH in CORN PRODUCTION. 

* Missouri ranks NINTH in COTTON PRODUCTION. 

* Missouri ranks TENTH in WINTER WHEAT PRODUCTION. 

* Missouri ranks TWELFTH in GRAPE PRODUCTION. 

* Missouri ranks THIRTEENTH in EGG PRODUCTION. 

* Missouri ranks SIXTEENTH in CASH RECEIPTS. 

* Missouri ranks SEVENTEENTH in MILK COWS. 



Rank Among States, 2002 



Rank 



Unit 



1/ Preliminary. 

2/ Inventory on hand January 1 , 2003. 

3/ Inventory on hand December 1 , 2002. 

4/ Inventory on hand December 1 , 2002 (excludes commercial broilers). 



Total 



Percent of 
U.S. Total 



General 










Farm Numbers 


2 


farms 


107,000 


5.0 


Cash Receipts v 


15 


billion dollars 


4.82 


2.4 


Crops 










Hay, excluding alfalfa 


2 


tons 


6,460,000 


8.4 


Hay, all 


3 


tons 


7,840,000 


5.2 


Sorghum, grain 


4 


bushels 


15,725,000 


4.3 


Rice 


6 


hundredweight 


11,011,000 


5.2 


Soybeans 


6 


bushels 


170,000,000 


6.2 


Watermelon 


8 


hundredweight 


1,326,000 


3.4 


Corn for grain 


9 


bushels 


283,500,000 


3.1 


Cotton 


9 


bales 


610,000 


3.6 


Cottonseed 


9 


tons 


229,000 


3.6 


Winter wheat 


10 


bushels 


34,200,000 


3.0 


Peaches (utilized commercial) 


12 


pounds 


5,460,000 


3.4 


Grapes 


12 


tons 


2,900 


0.04 


Tobacco 


13 


pounds 


3,055,000 


0.3 


Apples (utilized commercial) 


15 


pounds 


36,000,000 


0.3 


Oats 


20 


bushels 


1,680,000 


1.4 


Alfalfa hay 


21 


tons 


1,380,000 


1.9 


Sorghum, silage 


23 


tons 


6,000 


0.2 


Potatoes, all 


23 


hundredweight 


1,296,000 


0.3 


Corn silage 


25 


tons 


910,000 


0.9 


Livestock & Livestock Products 








Beef cow operations 


2 


number 


58,000 


7.2 


Cattle operations 


2 


number 


68,000 


6.6 


Beef cows n 


2 


head 


2,116,000 


6.4 


Calf crop 


2 


head 


2,090,000 


5.5 


All cows 2I 


3 


head 


2,250,000 


5.3 


Turkeys raised 


4 


head 


25,500,000 


9.4 


Ice cream (lowtat 


4 


gallons 


16,159,000 


4.5 


Milk cow operations 


6 


number 


3,500 


3.8 


Hogs & pigs 6I 


6 


head 


3,050,000 


5.1 


Cattle & calves 2I 


6 


head 


4,500,000 


4.7 


Hog operations 


10 


number 


2,800 


3.7 


Total cheese 


11 


pounds 


119,692,000 


1.3 


Ice Cream (regular 


11 


gallons 


21,901,000 


2.2 


Egg production 


13 


millions 


1,837 


2.1 


All chickens 4/ 


15 


head 


8,555,000 


1.9 


Sheep operations 


16 


number 


1,600 


2.5 


Milk cows Zl 


17 


head 


134,000 


1.5 


Milk production 


21 


pounds 


1,946,000,000 


1.1 


Cattle & calves on feed 


21 


head 


70,000 


0.5 


Sheep & lambs '" 


23 


head 


67,000 


1.1 


Wool production 


23 


pounds 


395,000 


1.0 


Honey production 


27 


pounds 


954,000 


0.6 



Number of Farms, Land in Farms and Average Farm Size, 
Missouri and United States, 1998-2002 v 





Missouri 


United States 


Year 


Number 
of Farms 


Land 
in Farms 


Avg. 
Farm Size 


Number 
of Farms 


Land 
in Farms 


Avg. 
Farm Size 





-thous.- 


-thous. acres- 


-acres- 


-thous.- 


-thous. acres- 


-acres- 


1998 


110 


30,100 


274 


2,191 


953,500 


435 


1999 


110 


30,100 


274 


2,192 


947,440 


432 


2000 


109 


30,000 


275 


2,172 


943,090 


434 


2001 


108 


29,900 


277 


2,156 


941,310 


437 


2002 


107 


29,800 


279 


2,158 


941,480 


436 



1/ A farm is any establishment from which $1,000 or more of agricultural products were sold or would normally be sold 
during the year. 



Number of Farms: Economic Sales Class; Selected States, and United States, 2002 




Economic Sales Class 




State 


$1,000-$9,999 


$10,000-$99,999 


$100,000 and 
over 


Total 



Arkansas 


26,500 


12,000 


10,000 


48,500 


Illinois 


26,000 


26,000 


24,000 


76,000 


Iowa 


28,000 


36,000 


28,500 


92,500 


Kansas 


22,000 


27,500 


13,500 


63,000 


Kentucky 


49,000 


33,500 


6,500 


89,000 


Missouri 


61,300 


35,400 


10,300 


107,000 


Nebraska 


13,000 


20,500 


18,500 


52,000 


Oklahoma 


55,000 


26,000 


6,000 


87,000 


Tennessee 


69,000 


17,000 


4,000 


90,000 


United States 


1,172,770 


637,160 


348,160 


2,158,090 



Missouri Farms & Average Farm Size 

7850 - 2002 



# Farms (000) 

300 

250 

200 



Avg. Size (acres) 
300 




1850 



1880 



1910 



1940 



1970 



1985 



1999 



2002 



Cash Receipts 

Farm Receipts from Sales of Specified Crops and Livestock, Missouri 1999' 



2002 



Commodity 


1999 


2000 


2001 


2002 






-thousand dollars- 




All commodities 


4,261,240 


4,559,866 


4,722,690 4,401,883 


Livestock and products 


2,485,076 


2,680,424 


2,684,103 2,302,053 


Meat animals 


1,326,808 


1,636,906 


1,520,699 1,252,071 


Cattle and calves 


870,379 


1,044,789 


926,286 


821,395 


Hogs 


452,219 


588,080 


591,161 


427,053 


Sheep and lambs 


4,210 


4,037 


3,252 


3,623 


Dairy products 


324,282 


269,709 


286,229 


236,037 


Poultry/eggs 


798,342 


735,812 


836,078 


774,783 


Chicken eggs 


72,670 


69,940 


75,585 


76,085 


Turkeys 


277,200 


272,228 


270,600 


281,826 


Miscellaneous livestock 


35,644 


37,997 


41,097 


39,162 


Honey 


1,061 


1,035 


1,083 


1,307 


Horses/mules 


3/ 


3/ 


3/ 


3/ 


Wool 


67 


43 


35 


55 


Aquaculture 


4,683 


5,085 


4,733 


2,928 


Catfish 


2,854 


3,117 


2,840 


1,070 


Trout 


1,829 


1,968 


1,893 


1,858 


Other livestock 


29,790 


31,760 


35,215 


34,835 


Crops 


1,776,164 


1,879,442 


2,038,587 2,099,830 


Food grains 


143,725 


175,391 


143,798 


146,002 


Rice 


58,318 


48,788 


46,727 


42,204 


Wheat 


85,407 


126,604 


97,071 


103,798 


Feed crops 


593,463 


711,602 


822,871 


794,375 


Corn 


436,738 


556,669 


623,835 


614,518 


Hay 


121,126 


117,778 


156,197 


141,221 


Oats 


368 


846 


838 


1,257 


Sorghum grain 


35,231 


36,308 


42,001 


37,379 


Cotton 


126,819 


100,019 


121,985 


128,650 


Cotton lint, all 


113,036 


79,894 


100,176 


108,138 


Cottonseed 


13,783 


20,125 


21,809 


20,513 


Tobacco 


6,145 


7,523 


5,877 


4,829 


Oil crops 


743,328 


731,092 


776,192 


866,331 


Soybeans 


743,145 


730,966 


775,874 


865,812 


Vegetables 


25,737 


25,771 


29,430 


31,634 


Potatoes 


9,774 


9,213 


9,608 


8,336 


Watermelons 


4,452 


4,446 


4,888 


7,691 


Fruits/nuts 


16,321 


13,638 


15,246 


16,920 


Apples 


4,770 


6,993 


6,505 


6,782 


Fresh 


4,112 


6,292 


5,815 


5,733 


Processing 


658 


701 


689 


1,049 


Grapes 


1,635 


1,636 


1,448 


1,783 


Peaches 


4,379 


3,325 


3,285 


5,460 


All other crops 


120,627 


114,406 


123,188 


111,088 



1/ Revised data for 1999-2001; preliminary data for 2002. 

2/ Not published to avoid disclosure of individual operations. 

3/ Included in other livestock. 

Source: Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Aqriculture. 



Crop Production, 2001-2002 



Crop 


Unit 


Acres 
Harvested 


Yield 
Per Acre 


Production 


2001 


2002 


2001 


2002 


2001 


2002 







-thousand 


acres- 






-thousand units- 


Corn / Grain 


bu. 


2,600 


2,700 


133.0 


105.0 


345,8000 


283,500 


Corn / Silage 


ton 


70 


70 


16.0 


13.0 


1,120 


910 


Sorghum / Grain 


bu. 


220 


185 


94.0 


85.0 


20,680 


15,725 


Sorghum / Silage 


ton 


3 


1 


8.0 


6.0 


24 


6.0 


Soybeans 


bu. 


4,900 


5,000 


38.0 


34.0 


186,200 


170,000 


Winter Wheat 


bu. 


760 


760 


54.00 


45.0 


41,040 


34,200 


Oats 


bu. 


20 


35 


50.0 


48.0 


1,000 


1,680 


All Rice " 


cwt. 


207 


182 


6,000 


6,050 


12,420 


11,011 


Long Grain 1/ 


cwt. 


206 


182 


6,000 


6,050 


12,360 


11,011 


Medium Grain 1/ 


cwt. 


1.0 


... 


5,950 




60 


— 


Potatoes 


cwt. 


5.6 


5.4 


340 


240 


1,904 


1,296 


Cotton 2 ' 


bale 


400 


368 


834 


796 


695 


610 


Cottonseed 


ton 


— 


... 


— 




268 


229 


Tobacco 


lb. 


1.3 


1.3 


2,370 


2,350 


3,081 


3,055 


All Hay 


ton 


4,050 


4,260 


1.94 


1.84 


7,853 


7,840 


Alfalfa Hay 


ton 


450 


460 


3.05 


3.00 


1,373 


1,380 


Other Hay 


ton 


3,600 


3,800 


1.80 


1.70 


6,480 


6,460 


Watermelons 


cwt. 


5.0 


5.1 


230 


260 


1,150 


1,326 


Apples 3 ' 


lb. 


C 


... 


C 


... 


41,000 


36,000 


Peaches 3 ' 


lb. 


C 


... 


C 


... 


9,000 


13,000 


Grapes 3 ' 


ton 


C 


... 


C 


... 


2.30 


2.90 


1/ Yield in pounds, production 


n hundredweigh 


. 












2/ Yield in pounds, production 


n 480 lb. bales. 














3/ Utilized production. 



















Value of Production, 2001-2002 


Crop 


Unit 


Average Value Per Unit 


Value of Production 


2001 | 2002 | 2001 | 2002 



Corn 


bu. 


1.96 


2.45 


677,768 


694,575 


Grain Sorghum 


bu. 


1.94 


2.41 


40,740 


37,866 


Soybeans 


bu. 


4.32 


5.40 


804,384 


918,000 


Winter Wheat 


bu. 


2.42 


3.15 


99,317 


107,730 


Oats 


bu. 


1.60 


1.85 


1,600 


3,108 


All Rice 


cwt. 


3.70 


3.55 


45,954 


39,089 


Potatoes 


cwt. 


5.10 


6.50 


9,710 


8,424 


All Hay 


ton 


75.00 


67.00 


551,911 


500,640 


Alfalfa Hay 


ton 


107.00 


110.00 


146,911 


151,800 


Other Hay 


ton 


62.50 


54.00 


405,000 


348,840 


Cotton 


lb. 


.300 


.430 


100,080 


125,904 


Cottonseed 


ton 


85.00 


95.00 


22,780 


21,755 


Tobacco 


lb. 


1.895 


1.90 


5,838 


5,805 


Watermelons 


cwt. 


4.25 


5.80 


4,888 


7,691 


Apples 1/ 


lb. 


.171 


.178 


7,017 


6,396 


Peaches 1/ 


lb. 


.365 


.420 


3,285 


5,460 


Grapes 1/ 


ton 


630.00 


615.00 


1,448 


1,783 


Total Crops 2 ' 3 ' 


... 


... 


... 


2,376,050 


2,484,226 



1/ Value of utilized production. 

2/ Total value of principal crops excluding rr 

3/ Alfalfa Hay and Other Hay excluded from 



inor commodities not shown above. 

Total Crops to avoid duplication with All Hay. 





2002 State Rankings and Production of Field Crops 




Hay 


Soybeans 


Corn for Grain 


Rank 


State 


Production 


State 


Production 


State 


Production 







1,000 tons 




1,000 bu. 




1,000 bu. 


1 


Texas 


13,850 


Iowa 


494,880 


Iowa 


1,963,500 


2 


California 


9,594 


Illinois 


449,780 


Illinois 


1,496,000 


3 


Missouri 


7,840 


Minnesota 


308,850 


Minnesota 


1,051,900 


4 


Kansas 


6,965 


Indiana 


235,750 


Nebraska 


940,800 


5 


Minnesota 


6,610 


Nebraska 


176,330 


Indiana 


631,620 


6 


Nebraska 


5,950 


Missouri 


170,000 


Wisconsin 


391,500 


7 


Iowa 


5,645 


Ohio 


141,300 


South Dakota 


304,000 


8 


Idaho 


5,608 


South 


126,790 


Kansas 


290,000 


9 


Kentucky 


5,520 


Arkansas 


96,480 


Missouri 


283,500 


10 


Wisconsin 


5,340 


North Dakota 


86,790 


Ohio 


252,560 


11 


Oklahoma 


5,030 


Michigan 


78,155 


Michigan 


232,300 


12 


South Dakota 


4,800 


Wisconsin 


66,880 


Texas 


205,660 


13 


Montana 


4,620 


Kansas 


58,420 


North Dakota 


114,425 


14 


Tennessee 


4,514 


Mississippi 


43,840 


Colorado 


112,320 


15 


North Dakota 


3,920 


Kentucky 


40,950 


Kentucky 


106,080 





Winter Wheat 


Sorghum for Grain 


Cotton 


Rank 


State 


Production 


State 


Production 


State 


Production 1/ 







1,000 bu. 




1,000 bu. 




1,000 bales" 


1 


Kansas 


267,300 


Kansas 


135,000 


Texas 


5,039 


2 


Washington 


103,250 


Texas 


130,050 


California 


2,010 


3 


Oklahoma 


98,000 


Arkansas 


17,710 


Mississippi 


1,980 


4 


Texas 


78,300 


Missouri 


15,725 


Arkansas 


1,650 


5 


Idaho 


54,510 


Nebraska 


15,000 


Georgia 


1,650 


6 


Ohio 


50,220 


Oklahoma 


14,850 


Tennessee 


813 


7 


Nebraska 


48,640 


Louisiana 


13,365 


North Carolina 


790 


8 


Arkansas 


38,640 


Illinois 


6,391 


Louisiana 


750 


9 


Colorado 


36,300 


Mississippi 


6,237 


Missouri 


610 


10 


Missouri 


34,200 


South 


3,060 


Alabama 


575 


11 


Michigan 


32,830 


New Mexico 


2,800 


Arizona 


576 


12 


Illinois 


31,850 


Tennessee 


2,480 


Oklahoma 


200 


13 


Oregon 


29,110 


Colorado 


1,800 


South 


130 


14 


California 


22,500 


Georgia 


1,290 


New Mexico 


114 


15 


Montana 


21,000 


California 


1,045 


Virginia 


99 



1/ Production ginned and to be ginned. 
2/ 480 lb. net weight bales. 



2002 Crop Yields by District 

-bushels per acre- 

Soybeans Grain Sorghum 





Corn 



Winter Wheat 




State = 105.0 
U.S. = 130.0 




Farmland Values 
By District, Missouri, January 1, 1999-2002 



Year 


NW 


NC 


NE 


WC 


C 


EC 


SW 


SC 


SE 


State 










dc 


liars per ac 


re 










1999 


1,080 


840 


1,050 


1,150 


1,070 


1,510 


1,370 


920 


1,500 


1,130 


2000 


1,210 


930 


1,130 


1,160 


1,270 


1,690 


1,490 


1,020 


1,630 


1,251 


2001 


1,360 


1,050 


1,250 


1,210 


1,420 


1,870 


1,630 


1,140 


1,750 


1,380 


2002 


1,470 


1,190 


1,370 


1,400 


1,570 


2,050 


1,780 


1,250 


1,870 


1,520 



Non-Irrigated Cropland Cash Rent per Acre 
By Districts, Missouri, 1999-2002 



Year 


NW 


NC 


NE 


WC 


C 


EC 


SW 


SC 


SE 


State 



dollars per acre 

1999 63.50 56.00 64.00 48.00 49.00 62.00 40.00 48.00 78.00 59.00 

2000 72.00 64.00 68.00 50.00 48.00 62.00 40.50 48.00 79.00 62.00 

2001 77.00 70.00 71.00 53.00 49.00 66.00 43.00 48.00 80.00 65.00 

2002 74.00 68.00 71.00 52.00 51.00 69.00 44.00 50.00 81.00 65.00 



Pasture Cash Rent Per Acre 
By Districts, Missouri, 1999-2002 



Year 


NW 


NC 


NE 


WC 


C 


EC 


SW 


SC 


SE 


State 










dc 


liars per ac 


re 










1999 


21.00 


19.50 


20.50 


18.50 


18.50 


18.50 


18.50 


16.00 


19.00 


18.50 


2000 


21.50 


20.00 


21.50 


21.00 


21.00 


20.50 


21.50 


16.00 


20.00 


20.00 


2001 


24.50 


22.50 


23.00 


24.50 


25.50 


22.50 


24.00 


16.00 


21.00 


22.50 


2002 


26.00 


23.00 


24.50 


24.00 


27.00 


23.50 


25.00 


17.50 


22.00 


23.60 



Crop Records for Missouri 
Acreage, Yield, Production 



Crop 



Date 

Series 

Began 



Record 



Acreage 
Harvested 



Year' 



Yield 
per 
Acre 



Year 1 



Total 
Production 



Year 1 ' 



Unit 



Corn-Grain 2 ' 


1919 


High 


-thousands- 

5,993 


1925 


-units- 

143.0 


2000 


-thousands- 

396,110 


2000 


bu. 






Low 


1,430 


1983 


9.3 


1934 


14,145 


1934 


bu. 


Corn-Silage 


1919 


High 


667 


1954 


16.0 


2001 


2,822 


1953 


tons 






Low 


32 


1926 


2.7 


1934 


198 


1935 


tons 


Soybeans 


1924 


High 


5,830 


1979 


38.0 


2001 


186,200 


2001 


bu. 






Low 


44 


1925 


5.0 


1936 


225 


1936 


bu. 


Sorghum for 
Grain 3 ' 


1929 


High 


1,410 


1985 


97.0 


1992 


117,030 


1985 


bu. 






Low 


23 


1951 


6.4 


1936 


167 


1936 


bu. 


Sorghum for 
Silage 


1929 


High 


144 


1957 


13.0 


1981 


1,408 


1958 


tons 






Low 


1 


2002 


4.1 


1936 


6 


2002 


tons 


Winter 

Wheat 4 ' 


1909 


High 


4,565 


1919 


54.0 


2001 


115,500 


1981 


bu. 






Low 


570 


1986 


8.5 


1916 


9,035 


1942 


bu. 


Oats 


1866 


High 


2,250 


1943 


61.0 


1997 


59,427 


1942 


bu. 






Low 


14 


1993 


10.0 


1901 


686 


1993 


bu. 


Cotton 5 ' 


1879 


High 


600 


1949 


856 


1994 


695 


2001 


bales 






Low 


32 


1879 


127 


1895 


12 


1895 


bales 


Cottonseed 


1879 


High 


— 


... 


... 


... 


234 


1996 


tons 






Low 


... 


... 


... 


... 


5 


1895 


tons 


All Rice 


1924 


High 


207 


2001 


6,050 


2002 


12,420 


2001 


cwt. 






Low 


1 


1924 


1,125 


1927 


22 


1924 


cwt. 


Tobacco 


1866 


High 


29.0 


1877 


2,600 


1970 


28,420 


1876 


lbs. 






Low 


1.3 


2002 


505 


1887 


2,340 


1918 


lbs. 


All Hay 


1909 


High 


4,260 


2002 


2.11 


1998 


7,853 


2001 


tons 






Low 


2,442 


1937 


.51 


1911 


1,567 


1911 


tons 


Alfalfa Hay 


1924 


High 


850 


1969 


3.25 


1998 


2,493 


1967 


tons 






Low 


120 


1930 


1.50 


1936 


216 


1930 


tons 


All Other Hay 


1924 


High 


3,800 


2002 


1.95 


1998 


6,480 


2001 


tons 






Low 


1,982 


1959 


.53 


1934 


1,402 


1936 


tons 


Apples 


1934 


High 


... 


... 


... 


... 


116,592 


1937 


lbs. 






Low 


... 


... 


... 


... 


17,934 


1936 


lbs. 


Peaches 


1899 


High 


... 


... 


... 


... 


192,000 


1906 


lbs. 






Low 


... 


... 


... 


... 


6/ 


1985 


lbs. 


Grapes 


1909 


High 


... 


... 


... 


... 


11.2 


1931 


tons 






Low 


... 


... 


... 


... 


.9 


1985 


tons 



1/ Latest years that records were achieved. In some cases these records were equaled in earlier years. 

2/ From 1866 through 1919, corn for grain was included in all corn estimates. 

3/ From 1919 through 1929, sorghum for grain was included in all sorghum estimates. 

4/ From 1866 through 1909, winter wheat was included in all wheat estimates. 

5/ Yield in pounds. 

6/ No significant commercial production due to frost. 



All Cattle & Calves 

By County, January 1, 2003 



60,000 head and Above 
40,000 - 59,999 head 
25,000-39,999 head 

Under 25,000 head 






Livestock on Farms Num 
January 1 


ber and Value, by Species, 
,1999-2003 


Year 


All Cattle and Calves 


All Hogs and Pigs 1/ 


All Sheep and Lambs 


Number 


Value per 
Head 


Number 


Value per Head 


Number 


Value per Head 





-thous hd- 


-dol- 


-thous hd- 


-dol- 


-thous hd- 


-dol- 


1999 


4,400 


550 


3,300 


40 


85 


90 


2000 


4,350 


620 


3,150 


64 


80 


94 


2001 


4,250 


680 


2,900 


67 


73 


110 


2002 


4,350 


670 


3,000 


68 


70 


110 


2003 


4,500 


660 


2,950 


61 


67 


110 



1/ December 1 preceding year. 



Number of Livestock Operationsby Species, 1998-2002 1/ 



Year 


Cattle 


Beef Cow 


Milk Cow 


Hog 


Sheep 



-number- 



1998 


69,000 


59,000 


4,300 


5,000 


2,000 


1999 


69,000 


59,000 


4,100 


4,000 


1,900 


2000 


68,000 


58,000 


3,900 


3,600 


1,800 


2001 


67,000 


57,000 


3,700 


3,100 


1,700 


2002 


68,000 


58,000 


3,500 


2,800 


1,600 



1/ One or more head on hand at any time during year. 



Livestock and Milk: 
Inventory, Production, Disposition and Income 



Classes 


Unit 


2001 


2002 


Cattle and Calves: 








Inventory January 1 


thousand head 


4,250 


4,350 


Calf Crop 


thousand head 


2,060 


2,090 


Inshipments 


thousand head 


40.0 


36.0 


Marketings 


thousand head 


1,790 


1,766 


Production 


million pounds 


1,186.4 


1,186.3 


Marketings 


million pounds 


1,085.8 


1,059.8 


Cash Receipts 


thousand dollars 


926,287 


821,394 


Price per 100 lbs. 








Cattle 


dollars 


76.20 


69.40 


Calves 


dollars 


99.50 


92.30 


Hogs and Pigs: 








Inventory Dec 1 prev year 


thousand head 


2,900 


3,000 


Pig Crop 


thousand head 


6,321 


6,214 


Inshipments 


thousand head 


1,590 


1,800 


Marketings 


thousand head 


7,394 


7,663 


Production 


million pounds 


1,188.5 


1,188.5 


Marketings 


million pounds 


1,249.3 


1,280.9 


Cash Receipts 


thousand dollars 


591,161 


427,053 


All Hogs Price per 100 lbs. 


dollars 


41.30 


30.10 


Milk Cows and Production of Milk: 






Milk Cows 


thousand head 


145 


137 


Milk per Cow 


pounds 


13,441 


14,204 


Total Milk 


million pounds 


1,949 


1,946 


1/ 
Cash Receipts 


thousand dollars 


286,229 


236,037 


Price per 100 lbs. of Milk 


dollars 


14.90 


12.30 



1/ dairy products, only 



Eggs 

Production and Value, 

1998-2002 



Commercial Broilers 
Production and Value, 1998-2002 



Year 1 



Eggs 
Produced 



Value of 
Production 



Year 



Number 
Produced 



Production 



Value of 
Productio 





- billion - 


- million dol - 




- million head - 


- million lbs - 


- million dol - 


1998 


1.732 


76.64 


1998 


255.0 


1,096.5 


416.67 


1999 


1.690 


72.67 


1999 


249.7 


1,123.7 


415.77 


2000 


1.614 


69.94 


2000 


2/ 






2001 


1.789 


75.59 


2001 


2/ 






2002 


1.837 


76.08 


2002 


2/ 







1/ Estimates cover the 12 month period, 
beginning December 1 of the previous year 
through November 30. 



1/ Estimates cover the 12 month period, beginning December 1 of 

the previous year through November 30. 

2/ Not published to avoid disclosure of individual operations. 



Chickens 
Number on Farms, by Classes, December 1, 1998-2002 







Hens and Pullets of 


Pullets Not of 


Laying Age 






All 


Laying Age 








Layers 1 


Layers 20 


13 Weeks Old 






Chickens 


Year Old & 


Weeks Old 


or Older But 


Under 13 


Other 


Year 


(Except 


Older 


But Less 


Less Than 20 


Weeks of 


Chickens 




Broilers) 




Than 1 Year 


Weeks 


Age 








- thousand hea 


d- 






1998 


8,810 


4,295 2,395 


832 


1,105 


183 


1999 


8,443 


3,330 2,854 


412 


1,665 


182 


2000 


8,225 


3,590 3,075 


480 


910 


170 


2001 


8,462 


3,908 2,955 


779 


640 


180 


2002 


8,555 


3,489 3,272 


816 


793 


185 



Turkeys 
Production and Value, 1998-2002 



Year 1 ' 


Number 
Raised 


Pounds 
Produced a 


Price 
per Pound 3/ 


Value of 
Production 





-million head- 


-million head- 


-cents- 


-million dollars- 


1998 


22.0 


598.4 


40.0 


239.36 


1999 


22.0 


616.0 


45.0 


277.20 


2000 


23.0 


618.7 


44.0 


272.23 


2001 


24.0 


660.0 


41.0 


270.60 


2002 


25.5 


782.9 


36.0 


281.83 



1/ Based on turkeys placed September 1 previous year through August 31 current year. Excludes young turkeys lost. 
2/ Includes home consumption. 
3/ Live weight equivalent price. 



State Rankings, January 1, 2003 



Rank 


All Cattle and Calves 


Beef Cows 


Milk Cows 


State 


1,000 
Head 


State 


1,000 
Head 


State 


1,000 
Head 


1 


Texas 


14,000 


Texas 


5,489 


California 


1,680 


2 


Kansas 


6,350 


Missouri 


2,116 


Wisconsin 


1,265 


3 


Nebraska 


6,200 


Oklahoma 


2,042 


New York 


680 


4 


Oklahoma 


5,400 


Nebraska 


1,934 


Pennsylvania 


590 


5 


California 


5,250 


South Dakota 


1,686 


Minnesota 


480 


6 


Missouri 


4,500 


Kansas 


1,525 


Idaho 


390 


7 


South Dakota 


3,700 


Montana 


1,402 


Texas 


311 


8 


Iowa 


3,600 


Kentucky 


1,120 


New Mexico 


310 


9 


Wisconsin 


3,300 


Tennessee 


1,106 


Michigan 


301 


10 


Colorado 


2,650 


Iowa 


992 


Ohio 


260 


11 


Minnesota 


2,470 


North Dakota 


973 


Washington 


247 


12 


Kentucky 


2,430 


Florida 


953 


Iowa 


208 


13 


Montana 


2,400 


Arkansas 


949 


Vermont 


153 


14 


Tennessee 


2,270 


California 


740 


Florida 


147 


15 


Idaho 


2,000 


Wyoming 


706 


Indiana 


145 


16 


North Dakota 


1,880 


Colorado 


702 


Missouri 


134 


State Rankings, December 1, 2002 


Rank 


All Hogs and Pigs 


Hogs for Breeding 


Market Hogs 


State 


1,000 
Head 


State 


1,000 
Head 


State 


1,000 
Head 


1 


Iowa 


15,300 


Iowa 


1,050 


Iowa 


14,250 


2 


North Carolina 


9,600 


North Carolina 


1,000 


North Carolina 


8,600 


3 


Minnesota 


5,900 


Minnesota 


580 


Minnesota 


5,320 


4 


Illinois 


4,050 


Illinois 


430 


Illinois 


3,620 


5 


Indiana 


3,150 


Nebraska 


365 


Indiana 


2,820 


6 


Missouri 


2,950 


Missouri 


360 


Missouri 


2,590 


7 


Nebraska 


2,900 


Indiana 


330 


Nebraska 


2,535 


8 


Oklahoma 


2,490 


Oklahoma 


330 


Oklahoma 


2,160 


9 


Kansas 


1,530 


Colorado 


160 


Kansas 


1,370 


10 


Ohio 


1,440 


Kansas 


160 


Ohio 


1,285 


11 


South Dakota 


1,290 


Ohio 


155 


South Dakota 


1,150 


12 


Pennsylvania 


1,080 


South Dakota 


140 


Pennsylvania 


955 


13 


Texas 


930 


Pennsylvania 


125 


Texas 


825 


14 


Michigan 


860 


Texas 


105 


Michigan 


760 


15 


Colorado 


790 


Michigan 


100 


Colorado 


630 



Top Ranking Counties 
2002 Crop Production & 2003 Cattle Inventory 





Hay 


Soybeans 


Corn 


Sorghum 


Wheat 




1 


Polk 


Stoddard 


Saline 


Audrain 


Mississippi 




2 


Lawrence 


Saline 


Stoddard 


Pemiscot 


Stoddard 




3 


Greene 


Audrain 


New Madrid 


Barton 


New Madrid 




4 


Newton 


Mississippi 


Holt 


New Madrid 


Barton 




5 


Barry 


New Madrid 


Lafayette 


Mississippi 


Scott 




6 


Bates 


Carroll 


Nodaway 


Dunklin 


Bates 




7 


Johnson 


Chariton 


Carroll 


Monroe 


Pemiscot 




8 


Laclede 


Lafayette 


Mississippi 


Dade 


Dunklin 




9 


Webster 


Nodaway 


Chariton 


Livingston 


Vernon 




10 


Cass 


Butler 


Scott 


Stoddard 


Pettis 






Cotton 


Rice 


Tobacco 


All Cattle 


Beef Cows 


Milk Cows 


1 


Dunklin 


Butler 


Platte 


Lawrence 


Texas 


Wright 


2 


New Madrid 


Stoddard 


Buchanan 


Howell 


Polk 


Webster 


3 


Pemiscot 


New Madrid 


Howard 


Polk 


Lawrence 


Lawrence 


4 


Stoddard 


Pemiscot 


Chariton 


Texas 


Barry 


Laclede 


5 


Scott 


Dunklin 


Clinton 


Barry 


Bates 


Polk 


6 




Ripley 


Boone 


Bates 


Howell 


Douglas 


7 








Wright 


Greene 


Texas 


8 








Greene 


Johnson 


Dallas 


9 








Johnson 


Nodaway 


Barry 


10 








Newton 


Newton 


Howell 



Missouri Equine Ranks #3 

Results of the statistically sampled survey of Missouri equine enthusiasts, during 
2002, indicate Missouri equine inventories may be the third largest in the nation. At 
200,000 head, only Texas and California have recorded larger numbers at 600,000 
and 240,000 head respectively. Current data on the equine industry remains sketchy 
as the comparative inventory numbers came from a 1999 survey published by 
USDA-NASS. Independent analysis of the equine industries does exist although the 
USDA data were collected across all states using the same methodology during the 
same time period. For that reason, comparison is made using the USDA data. 

Inventory Valued at $420 million 

The estimated value of all equine in Missouri on January 1 , 2002 was second only to 
the cattle and calf industry. At $420 million, the equine value compares to $2.9 billion 
for cattle and calves and well ahead of hogs and pigs valued at $204 million as of 
December 1, 2001. 

Operating expenses totaled $200 million for the year 2001, with more than $80 
million for feed and bedding. Forty million dollars were spent on health related 
expenses. Assets of the state's equine industry were estimated at $8.5 billion, with 
land and building accounting for nearly 90 percent of the assets. 



Missouri Equine by Breed - January 2002 



Breed 


Number 


Value(OOO) 


Quarter Horse 


76,000 


$160,000 


Paint 


33,000 


$70,000 


Foxtrotter 


16,000 


$38,000 


Tennessee Walker 


9,500 


$24,000 


Arabian 


8,500 


$21,000 


Appaloosa 


6,500 


$7,400 


Crossbred 


6,000 


$9,500 


Saddlebred 


5,000 


$10,500 


Other Light Horse Breeds 


12,500 


$39,600 


Total Light Horse Breeds 


173,000 


$380,000 


Race Horse Breeds 


4,000 


$17,000 


Belgian 


2,500 


$3,400 


Percheron 


1,900 


$2,700 


Other Draft Horse Breeds 


1,600 


$1,900 


Total Draft Horse Breeds 


6,000 


$8,000 


Miniatures 


3,500 


$2,200 


Other Pony Breeds 


4,500 


$3,300 


Total Pony Breeds 


8,000 


$5,500 


Donkeys, Mules and Burros 


9,000 


$9,500 


Total All Breeds 


200,000 


$420,000 



Missouri Vegetable Survey 2001 

Missouri vegetable sales during 2001 amounted to over $32 million from 
more than 35,600 acres of commercial production. The survey was 
conducted in cooperation with the University of Missouri, contacting all 
known commercial vegetable producers. The survey results exclude home 
garden production for private use. Data was obtained from 426 vegetable 
growers by mail and telephone follow-up, but no allowance was made for 
incompleteness for growers who did not participate. Highlights of the survey 
are as follows: 



10 Leading Vegetable Crops in Missouri in 2001 



5 leading Vegetable Counties in Missouri, 2001 




10 w 

w ■ 1 

0) 






< 1 

■a 

= 6 1 







Thousand Acres 



Dunklin Barton Jasper 

Mississippi Newton All Other Counties 



Average sales value of about $900 per acre grown 
Over 40 different vegetables produced commercially in Missouri 
Sixty-five percent of the vegetable acreage was irrigated 
Growers produced vegetables on 234 acres using organic practices. 
Producers averaged 52.7 years of age and had 14 years of 
experience. 



Type of Marketing, Percent by Sales Value 

Direct store delivery 
6.0% 
Farmers markets 
7.0% 



Retailed at farm 
9.0% 



Wholesale brokers 
25.0% 




Direct to processors 
52.0% 



Agricultural Exports 
Value and Ranking by Commodity Group, Fiscal Year 



2002 1 



Commodity Group 


United States 


Missouri 


Ranking 




-million dollars- 




Rice 


829.3 


42.6 


6th 


Soybeans and products 


7,325.7 


471.9 


7th 


Feeds and Fodders 


1,951.2 


55.1 


8th 


Feed grains and products 


6,779.2 


245.6 


10th 


Dairy products 


1,030.7 


16.3 


11th 


Cotton and linters 


2,052.1 


68.4 


11th 


Cottonseed and products 


97.6 


3.5 


11th 


Tobacco (unmanufactured) 


1,147.4 


3.4 


14th 


Wheat and products 


4,787.1 


134.4 


14th 


Hides and skins 


1,776.0 


4.2 


21st 


Animal fats, oils, and greases 


454.4 


1.1 


22nd 


Poultry and products 


2,279.3 


25.6 


22nd 


Live animals and meat (excluding poultry) 


6,097.4 


16.6 


26th 


Seeds (excluding cottonseed) 


839.2 


17.1 


NA 


Total Agricultural Exports 


53,293.6 


1,177.8 


15th 



1/ Fiscal year, October 1 - September 30. 

Source: Economic Research Service, Commodity Economics Division, U.S. Department of Agriculture. 



Export Values of Agricultural Commodities 
Missouri 1999-2002 v 



Commodity 


1999-2000 


2000-2001 


2001-2002 






-million dollars- 




Wheat and wheat products 


120.9 


130.5 


134.4 


Rice 


48.8 


43.6 


42.6 


Feed grains and grain products 


177.8 


262.0 


245.6 


Soybeans and soybean products 


368.6 


432.1 


471.9 


Cotton and linters 


47.6 


61.8 


68.4 


Cottonseed and cottonseed products 


2.5 


2.8 


3.5 


Tobacco 


3.0 


3.2 


3.4 


Fruit 


4.8 


3.4 


4.4 


Dairy products 


17.9 


18.8 


16.3 


Poultry and products 


69.9 


76.3 


25.6 


Live animals and meat,(excluding poultry) 


75.8 


80.2 


16.6 


Animal fats, oils and greases 


3.1 


2.1 


1.1 


Hides and skins 


3.9 


5.0 


4.2 


Seeds, excluding cottonseed 


14.5 


16.1 


17.1 


Feeds and fodders 


56.5 


53.4 


55.1 


Other (Miscellaneous) 


50.2 


51.3 


56.5 


Total Agricultural Exports 


1,073.6 


1,250.1 


1,177.8 



1/ Fiscal year, October 1 - September 30. 

Source: Economic Research Service, Commodity Economics Division, U.S. Department of Agriculture. 



Corn: 

Grain 
Silage 



Usual Planting and Harvesting Dates, 
By Crop and Principal Producing Areas 



Crop 


Usual 

Planting 

Dates 


Usual Harvesting Dates 


Principal 
Producing 
Areas and 

Counties 


Begin 


Most Active 


End 





Apr5-Jun10 Sep 1 Sep 20-Oct 30 Dec 1 Statewide 

Apr10-Jun10 Aug 15 Aug25-Sep15 Sep 25 Statewide 



Cotton: 



Apr 25-Jun 1 Sep 20 Oct 5-Oct 30 Nov 20 Southeast 



Hay: 












Alfalfa 
Other 




May 15 
May 20 




Sep 15 
Sep 10 


Statewide 
Statewide 


Oats: 


Mar 1 -Apr 30 


Jun 20 


Jul 1-Jul 25 


Aug1 


Statewide 




Potatoes: 


Mar 1-Apr5 


Jun 15 


Jun20-Jul 15 


Aug 25 


Mississippi 
Scott, 



Atchison 



Rice: 



Apr15-Jun10 Sep 10 Sep 25-Oct 25 Nov 1 



Butler, 
Stoddard 



Sorghum: 

Grain 
Silage 



Apr25-Jul1 Sep 10 Sep 25-Oct 30 Nov 25 Statewide 

May 1 -Jul 1 Aug 15 Aug25-Sep15 Oct 10 Statewide 



Soybeans: 


May5-Jul 10 


Sep 25 


Oct 10-Oct30 


Nov 25 


Statewide 




Tobacco: 


May 10-Jun 15 


Aug 10 


Aug25-Sep 15 


Sep 25 


Platte, 
Buchanan 




Wheat: 


Sep 20-Nov 20 


Jun 15 


Jun20-Jul 10 


Jul 20 


Statewide 



Missouri Agricultural Statistics Districts 
2002 Precipitation * 



25.78 

NORTHWEST 



38.16 

■NORTHEAST 



39.79 

CENTRAL 




WEST CENTRAL) 

31.93 



SOUTHWEST 

38.65 



| State Average: 40.43 inches | 



'Precipitation data represents one location per county and is furnished 
primarily by the USDA Farm Service Agency county offices. 



First and Last Freeze Dates 





First Freeze 1 


Last Freeze 1 




Dates 


Dates 


Area/Station 


Median 


Median 


North 






Hamilton 


10/10 


4/26 


Hannibal 


10/21 


4/13 


Kirksville 


10/12 


4/21 


Lexington 


10/26 


4/10 


Maryville 


10/05 


4/27 


Princeton 


10/06 


4/26 


Salisbury 


10/14 


4/16 


Central 






Camdenton 


10/19 


4/10 


Clinton 


10/19 


4/16 


Fredericktown 


10/06 


4/28 


Jefferson City 


10/14 


4/17 


Nevada 


10/12 


4/21 


St. Charles 


10/17 


4/13 


South 






Cape Girardeau 


10/21 


4/10 


Caruthersville 


11/05 


4/01 


Mountain Grove 


10/17 


4/14 


Neosho 


10/10 


4/20 


Poplar Bluff 


10/28 


4/06 


Salem 


10/11 


4/22 


Springfield 


10/18 


4/20 


West Plains 


10/17 


4/16 



1/ Probability of 50%, that the Afirst frost@ will occur before the fall date listed or the Alast frost@ will occur after 
the spring date listed. 



Source: Midwestern Climate Center, Champaign IL 



Missouri Normal Precipitation 1/ 



Location 


Jan 


Feb 


Mar 


Apr 


May 


Jun 


Jul 


Aug 


Sep 


Oct 


Nov 


Dec 


Annual 


North 














inches 












Hamilton 


1.07 


1.15 


2.72 


3.57 


4.84 


4.18 


3.87 


3.70 


4.63 


3.22 


2.44 


1.63 


37.02 


Kirksville 


1.00 


1.13 


2.46 


3.35 


4.96 


4.40 


4.67 


3.63 


3.99 


3.18 


2.71 


1.65 


37.13 


Maryville 


.87 


.99 


2.37 


3.16 


4.58 


4.16 


5.24 


3.82 


4.06 


2.97 


2.33 


1.29 


35.84 


Monroe City 


1.93 


2.00 


3.26 


3.83 


4.86 


4.15 


4.13 


3.76 


3.39 


2.78 


3.39 


2.61 


40.09 


Princeton 


.90 


1.07 


2.35 


3.53 


4.58 


4.24 


5.11 


3.72 


3.86 


2.96 


2.28 


1.51 


36.11 


Salisbury 


1.56 


1.83 


2.88 


3.71 


5.16 


4.58 


4.06 


3.96 


4.49 


3.25 


3.15 


2.29 


40.92 


Central 




























Camdenton 


1.76 


2.33 


3.55 


4.29 


5.28 


3.87 


3.77 


3.52 


4.26 


4.10 


4.05 


2.81 


43.59 


Clinton 


1.57 


2.04 


3.22 


4.03 


5.51 


5.11 


3.87 


4.08 


4.57 


3.76 


3.69 


2.16 


43.57 


Columbia 


1.73 


2.20 


3.21 


4.16 


4.87 


4.02 


3.80 


3.75 


3.42 


3.18 


3.47 


2.47 


40.28 


De Soto 


2.46 


2.24 


3.66 


4.07 


4.40 


3.84 


3.40 


3.50 


3.00 


2.70 


3.96 


3.11 


40.34 


Fredericktown 


2.75 


2.58 


4.13 


4.46 


4.72 


3.83 


3.77 


3.85 


3.11 


3.11 


4.80 


3.95 


45.06 


Kansas City 


1.15 


1.31 


2.44 


3.38 


5.39 


4.44 


4.42 


3.54 


4.64 


3.33 


2.30 


1.64 


37.98 


Nevada 


1.67 


1.99 


3.66 


4.31 


5.27 


5.63 


3.96 


3.97 


4.22 


4.18 


3.58 


2.34 


44.78 


Rolla 


2.21 


2.29 


3.77 


4.18 


4.81 


3.97 


4.40 


4.01 


3.78 


3.50 


4.35 


3.22 


44.49 


Warrenton 


1.74 


1.99 


3.22 


3.75 


4.42 


3.86 


3.78 


2.70 


2.81 


2.73 


3.68 


2.41 


37.09 


South 




























Cape Girardeau 


3.38 


3.44 


4.57 


4.34 


5.09 


3.81 


3.45 


3.28 


3.30 


3.17 


4.50 


4.21 


46.54 


Mtn. Grove 


2.35 


2.59 


4.24 


4.43 


4.77 


4.12 


3.92 


3.30 


4.12 


3.59 


4.55 


3.59 


45.57 


Neosho 


1.97 


2.28 


3.85 


4.35 


5.19 


5.06 


3.28 


3.59 


4.94 


3.97 


4.43 


2.97 


45.88 


Poplar Bluff 


2.96 


3.48 


4.71 


4.77 


4.37 


3.96 


3.83 


3.38 


3.37 


3.35 


4.90 


4.32 


47.40 


Springfield 


2.11 


2.28 


3.82 


4.31 


4.57 


5.02 


3.56 


3.37 


4.83 


3.47 


4.46 


3.17 


44.97 


West Plains 


2.60 


3.00 


4.80 


4.35 


4.62 


4.33 


3.13 


3.16 


4.02 


3.40 


4.91 


3.97 


46.29 



1/ Normal period is the average of 1971 

Source: United States Department of Commerce, 



2000. 

NOAA, Environmental Data i 



nd Information Service.